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SYN. Incensed, Outraged, Umbrageous, Infuriated, Peeved

Definition: Feeling or expressing anger or scorn, esp. at unjust, mean, or ungrateful action or treatment

Example:
"
Thrulow Weed, Esq
Springfield, Ills, Feb. 4, 1861

My dear sir. I have both you letter to myself, and that to Judge David, in relations to a certain gentleman in your state claiming to dispense partonage in my name, and also to be authorized to use my name to advance the chances of Mr. Greely for an election to the U.S. senate. It is very strange that such things should be said by any one. The gentleman you mention, did speak to me of Mr. Greely, in connection with the Senatorial election, and I replied in terms of kindness towards Mr. Greenly which I really feel, but always with an express protest that my name must not be used in the senatorial election, in favor of, or against any one. Any other representation of me, is a misrepresentation.
As to the matter of dispensing patronage, it perhaps will surprise you to learn, that I have information that you claim to have my authority to arrange that matter in N.Y. I do not believe you have so claimed ; but still so some men say. On that subject you know all I have to said to you is “justice to all,” and I beg you to believe I have said nothing more particular to any one. I say this to re-assure you that I have not changed my purpose; in the hope, however, that you will not sue my name in the matter. Yours truly
                             A. LINCOLN"
Abraham Lincoln To Thurlow Weed (Abraham Lincoln)

Explanation:
Lincoln conveys a indignant tone toward addressing his frustration to Weed by how he appears calm and serious when he first confronts Weed of his mistakes ,as displayed, within the lines, “It is very strange that such things should be said by any one”  indicating that Lincoln's  ability to concealed his vexed tone by the formal and polite statements such as exhibited with the opening line, “My dear sir.” Additionally, Lincoln implies an cynical attitude toward Weed, due to his manipulation of language, as displayed, within the statement, “As to the matter of dispensing patronage, it perhaps will surprise you to learn, that I have information that you claim to have my authority to arrange that matter in N.Y” which vindicates that the “you”, emphasizes that Lincoln directs that intentionally on Weed with a indignant tone. Moreover, the clause before that statment vindicates Lincoln’s cynical side, because he states that it might astonish Weed to know that he discovered information about him conducting the unjustified act because Weed had no permission from Lincoln himself, therefore justifying his outraged tone. Lincoln ends his letter by stating, “Yours truly” which reassures his frustration toward Weed’s inconsiderate act, therefore vindicates his usage of manipulation of a formal ending conveyed with a infuriated tone.
 

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