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REFLECTIVE

HOME
CYNICAL
ALLUSIVE
DIDACTIC
CONFIDENT
DRAMATIC
CASUAL
DISGUSTED
FANCIFUL
INDIGNANT
MOCKING
MOURNFUL
PLAYFUL
PRETENTIOUS
PROUD
REFLECTIVE
QUIZ!!
LINKS

SYN. Brooding, Comtemplative, Meditative, Musing, Pensive, Pondering, Ruminative

Definition: Capable of exercising thought or judgement; devoted to matters of the mind

Example:
“Better than these walks, a treat announced perhaps once a forthnight, was an afternoon sailing. We would hire a lugger, the fisherman went with us. But once toby was allowed to sterr us home. “show them you can bring her in, my boy,” father said, with his usual trust and pride in Thoby. And Thoby took the fisherman’s place; and steered; flushed and with his blue eyes very blue, and his mouth set, he sat there bring us round the point, into harbour, without letting the sail flag. One day the sea was full of pale jelly fish, like lamps, with streaming hair; but they stung you if you touched them. Sometimes lines would be handed us; baited by gobbets cut from fish; and the line thrilled in one’s fingers as the boat tossed and shot through the water; and then- how can I convey the excitement?-there was a little leaping tu; then another: up one hauled; up through the water at length came the white twisting fish; and was slapped on the floor. There it lay flapping this way and that in an inch or two of water.”
Virginia Woolf

Explanation:
Woolf displays a reflective tone within this excerpt due to her usage of specific details within illustrate vivid images of the fond memory of her father and brother fishing day. The simile, “ like lamps with streaming hair” display how her imaginative attitude toward the description of the sea, illustrating the vigorous movements of the sea, which vindicates her reflective tone. Additionally, her use of dialogue, creates a active atmosphere and displays her accuracy of the entire event, therefore justifying that her reminiscing tone displays her admiration and affection toward her father as displayed within the sentences, “’Show them you can bring her in, my boy,’ father said, with his usual trust and pride in Thoby.” Moreover, Woolf also display admiration toward her brother by how when her father allowed Thoby to guide them home, as exhibited by the sentences, “But once Thoby was allowed to steer us home…And Thoby took the fisherman’s place; steered; flushed and with his blue eyes very blue, and his mouth set, he sat there, bring us round the point, into harbour, without leetting the sail flag.” the repetition of the adjective “blue” vindicates how the color of his eyes reflect his inevitable strength, therefore vindicates her usage of ruminative tone toward depicting that wonderful afternoon. Hence, Woolf’s indication of an rhetorical sentence within dashes, “ -how can I convey the excitement?-” emphasizes her vigorous attitude toward the event and how it excites her spirits, which left her speechless, therefore depicting her happiness toward her memory. Exhibiting the connections among every clause, Woolf uses semicolons, as displayed by clauses, “Sometimes lines would be handed us; baited by gobbets cut from fish; and the line thrille din one’s fingers as the boat tossed and shot into the water…was slapped on the floor.” illustrates how the action of catching the fish, emphasizes the importance and it’s impact toward Woolf’ strong sentimental feelings toward both her father and brother.

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